binary zoo
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
January 22, 2018, 06:30:25 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
30178 Posts in 1158 Topics by 195 Members
Latest Member: dianeanderson
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  binary zoo
|-+  General
| |-+  Wildlife
| | |-+  Space - It's Rather Large
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 14 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Space - It's Rather Large  (Read 33715 times)
fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« on: February 08, 2010, 05:27:32 PM »

Seen this sort of thing loads of times before, but I love all this relative scale stuff.  Reading A Brief History of Time I can kind of get my head around the really small stuff, the bigger stuff is just beyond my comprehension though.

Star Size Comparison HD
Logged

T_M_C
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000

TMC


View Profile Email
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 10:23:31 AM »

Thats a really cool video.

Makes you stop and think.   Roll Eyes

TMC
Logged
fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2010, 09:13:06 PM »

Hubble capturing an image of two asteroids colliding.  Either that's a fairly common occurrence or they were bloody lucky.


http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/asteroid-collision-leaves-scientists-starstruck-20100208-nn7e.html
Logged

fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2010, 11:26:41 AM »

New Hubble images of the auroras on Saturn.  Awesome.


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1250445/Hubble-telescope-films-Saturns-eerie-twin-aurorae.html

Hubble Views Saturn's Northern/Southern Lights [HD]
Logged

T_M_C
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000

TMC


View Profile Email
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2010, 10:03:14 AM »

Excellent Image.   Shocked

I remember when i first saw Saturn, for real through some binoculars, it was an incredible site.  I had to keep them rock still on my window ledge and concentrate.

But it is really an awe inspiring site.

If you have any Binoculars at hand.  Just point them at Saturn, it is probably the best thing to see in the night sky for most people.  You can see the rings quite distinctly from the globe but not much definition.

The moon on the other hand moves so fast across the sky, it's constantly in motion though Binoculars or a Telescope.  But you can see so much more detail.

You can also see the ice poles of Mars with Binoculars too.

Trouble with town and city sky watching though is the light pollution.
Just whites out alot of stuff which would otherwise be excellent viewing through binoculars.

Oh, and looking at the Sun through Binoculars or a telescope can ruin your eyesigjht.   Undecided

TMC
Logged
TheKhakinator
Chiptune Wizard
Playtester
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2888


Grav Corp, Moonfaker.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2010, 01:24:15 PM »

True words you speak about Saturn, there. Of everything I've seen through a telescope, Saturn and its rings are the most memorable for me.

I also have a fondness for Orion's belt for being so gosh darned easy to find in the sky.
Logged

fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2010, 05:56:43 PM »

I remember when i first saw Saturn, for real through some binoculars, it was an incredible site.  I had to keep them rock still on my window ledge and concentrate.

But it is really an awe inspiring site.
Same here.  I always assumed you needed a really powerful telescope to see it so was totally amazed when someone showed it to me.  Saturn?  Yeah right.......holy shit.

A lot of this stuff you read and the TV documentaries you see about space can seem a bit unreal, but when you see something like Saturn for the first time it suddenly makes everything real.  Does that make sense lol Smiley
Logged

T_M_C
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000

TMC


View Profile Email
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2010, 09:56:58 AM »

Quote
True words you speak about Saturn, there. Of everything I've seen through a telescope, Saturn and its rings are the most memorable for me.

I also have a fondness for Orion's belt for being so gosh darned easy to find in the sky.


Yeh, orion is one of most recognisable constellations.   Grin

And the Nebula just below the belt is awsome through a scope.  Visible to the naked eye too, if you know where to look.

The first constellation i learnt to recognise was the Plough ( Big Dipper ) part of Ursa Major. Then it was Orion.



Quote
Same here.  I always assumed you needed a really powerful telescope to see it so was totally amazed when someone showed it to me.  Saturn?  Yeah right.......holy shit.

A lot of this stuff you read and the TV documentaries you see about space can seem a bit unreal, but when you see something like Saturn for the first time it suddenly makes everything real.  Does that make sense lol


Yeh, i know what you mean.

Looking skywards seems to put everything into perspective.

TMC
Logged
fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2010, 01:42:17 PM »

Nice gallery this.  Stick some of these in a game and you'd probably get told they don't look very realistic.

http://heritage.stsci.edu/gallery/gallery_category.html
Logged

las6
Escaped from The Zoo
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1039


creepy!

lauri_suopera@msn.com
View Profile
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2010, 09:50:05 PM »

I'm pretty sure mass effect uses some of these images as the backdrops for the star clusters. Not saying because that it makes the game better - in fact, some of the backdrops are a bit low-res. Wink
Logged

T_M_C
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000

TMC


View Profile Email
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2010, 09:42:47 AM »

Excellent images.

I've bookmarked that site for future reference.   Smiley

TMC
Logged
fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2010, 05:58:52 PM »

I'm pretty sure mass effect uses some of these images as the backdrops for the star clusters. Not saying because that it makes the game better - in fact, some of the backdrops are a bit low-res. Wink
Would that be you running the PC version at a silly resolution just because you can? Smiley
Logged

fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2010, 11:43:24 PM »

This is pretty amazing.   See if you could guess what it was before reading the description below the pic.  (ignoring the huge clue that I'm posting this in the "Space" thread  Tongue )

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap100119.html

Another great site for unusual space related pics BTW.  Smiley
Logged

T_M_C
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 3000

TMC


View Profile Email
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2010, 10:02:03 AM »

Nice Piccy.

I had seen it before on Earthfiles and coasttocoast.   Grin

Last weeks Sky At night episode was dedicated to the Mars rovers.  Really interesting programme.   Smiley
I usualy try and catch the repeats on a saturday.

TMC
Logged
fog
Zookeeper
1000 XP
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 13185



View Profile WWW Email
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2010, 05:30:09 PM »

In the last upgrade Hubble had an IMAX 3D camera fitted which should give some awesome pictures.  Quite tempted to book a couple of tickets for this when it shows up here:

Quote
    Through the power of IMAX® 3D, Hubble 3D will enable movie-goers to journey through distant galaxies to explore the grandeur and mysteries of our celestial surroundings, and accompany space-walking astronauts as they attempt the most difficult and important tasks in NASA’s history. The film will offer an inspiring and unique look into the Hubble Space Telescope’s legacy and highlight its profound impact on the way we view the universe and ourselves.

    Hubble 3D is an IMAX and Warner Bros. Pictures production, in cooperation with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The film reunites the Space Station 3D filmmaking team, led by Producer/Director Toni Myers.

    Hubble 3D will blast off exclusively to IMAX and IMAX 3D theatres on March 19th, 2010.
Logged

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 14 Go Up Print 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!